Chuck Wendigo Bibliography Meaning

English[edit]

WOTD – 31 October 2018

Etymology[edit]

From Ojibwewiindigoo, from Proto-Algonquian*wi·nteko·wa(“owl; malevolent spirit, cannibalistic monster”). Compare Creewihtikow/ᐃᐧᐦᑎᑯᐤ(iyhtikow, “greedy person; cannibal; giant man-eating monster”).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wendigo (pluralwendigoorwendigosorwendigoes)

  1. (mythology) A malevolent and violentcannibalspirit found in Anishinaabe, Ojibwe, and Creemythology, which is said to inhabit the body of a living person and possess him or her to commitmurder.
    • 1905, Ernest Thompson Seton, “The Wendigo: Winter Death”, in Woodmyth & Fable, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC503772490, page 161:
      Through the pine woods of Keewaydin, / Over the snows of Shebandowan, / The Wendigo roams in the winter's frost / And pursues to destruction the hunter. / Yet no man can meet with the Wendigo, / No man can face him or see him; / Only his track in the snow is seen, / And lost is the hunter that sees it. […] The heart that ne'er quailed on the war-path / Turns to stone at the name of the Wendigo.
    • 1998, Sidney L. Harring, “‘The Enforcement of the Extreme Penalty’: Canadian Law and the Ojibwa-Cree Spirit World”, in White Man’s Law: Native People in Nineteenth-century Canadian Jurisprudence, Toronto, Ont.; Buffalo, N.Y.; London: Published for The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History by University of Toronto Press, ↑ISBN:
      A series of ‘wendigo’ killings – a ‘wendigo’ was an evil spirit clothed in human flesh – brought to the attention of Canadian law around the turn of the twentieth century represent the extension of Canadian law to the heart of traditional Indian culture. These killings, however, also represent the extent to which some of the First Nations defied or ignored that law. […] Machekequonabe, an Ojibwa, was found guilty of manslaughter in an 1896 trial for killing what he believed to be a wendigo. […] Furthermore, in additional cases it seems that Indians, in order to protect their religious and cultural beliefs from Canadian law, carefully distorted the facts of homicide cases to conceal that they were wendigo killings.
    • 2004 September, Michael Jensen, chapter 9, in Firelands, Los Angeles, Calif.: Alyson Books, ↑ISBN, page 130:
      Suddenly, I was certain what I had found had been the rest of the dead girl. I told the others about it, then added, "God Almighty. It must have been eating her." / "I think I know this creature," said Gwennie, and we all looked at her. "It called a wendigo. A most terrible thing." […] / Gwennie shook her head. "It is an evil creature. I hear of it once when I traveled far from here. The Ojibwe brave who told me about creature say it is a beast of the north, of the cold."
    • 2005, Joseph Boyden, Three Day Road: A Novel, Toronto, Ont.: Viking Canada, ↑ISBN; republished Toronto, Ont.: Penguin Canada, 2008, ↑ISBN, page 49:
      No one is safe in such times, not even the Cree of Mushkegowuk. War touches everyone, and windigos spring from the earth.
  2. (attributively)Often inwendigo psychosis: a psychologicalconditionspecific to some Native Americangroups, in which a person in fever-induceddelusionsbelieves that he or she is possessed by a cannibalistic wendigo spirit, or in which members of the groups hysterically believe a person to be so possessed.
    • 1982 August, Lou Marano, “Windigo Psychosis: The Anatomy of an Emic–Etic Confusion”, in Current Anthropology, volume 23, number 4, JSTOR2742266, abstract, page 385; reprinted in Ronald C. Simons and Charles C[ampbell] Hughes, editors, The Culture-bound Syndromes: Folk Illnesses of Psychiatric and Anthropological Interest (Culture, Illness, and Healing), Dordrecht, Netherlands: D. Reidel Publishing Company, 1985, DOI:10.1007/978-94-009-5251-5, ↑ISBN, page 411:
      "Windigo psychosis" has been the most celebrated culture trait of the Northern Algonkian peoples for almost half a century. […] The conclusion reached is that, although aspects of the windigo belief complex may have been "components in some individuals' psychological dysfunction" (Preston 1980: 128), there probably never were any windigo psychotics in the sense that cannibalism or murder was committed to satisfy an obsessional craving for human flesh. It is argued, rather that windigo psychosis as an etic/behavioral form of anthropophagy is an artifact of research conducted with an emic/mental bias.

Alternative forms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

See also:Chuck

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Variant of chock.

Noun[edit]

chuck (pluralchucks)

  1. (cooking)Meat from the shoulder of a cow or other animal.
    • 1975, Thomas Fabbricante, William J. Sultan, Practical Meat Cutting and Merchandising: Beef, page 141,
      Arm chucks represent approximately 54% of the beef forequarters.
    • 2001, Bruce Aidells, Denis Kelly, The Complete Meat Cookbook: A Juicy and Authoritative Guide, page 190:
      Often, pieces of the chuck are sold boneless as flat chunks of meat or rolled and tied.
    • 2006, North American Meat Processors Association, The Meat Buyers Guide: Beef, Lamb, Veal, Pork, and Poultry, page 113,
      The chucks are that portion of foresaddle remaining after excluding the hotel rack and plate portions of the breast as described in Item No. 306. The veal foreshanks (Item No. 312) and brisket may either be attached or separated and packaged with the chucks.
  2. (mechanical engineering) A mechanicaldevice that holds an object firmly in place, for example holding a drill bit in a high-speed rotating drill or grinder.
    • 1824, Royal Society of Arts (Great Britain), Transactions, Volume 42, page 88,
      I have had a chuck of this kind made in brass with the cones of iron, but it is cumbrous and expensive, and does not answer so well, owing to the surface of the iron offering less resistance to the work turning within it. This, perhaps, might be remedied by roughing; but I think the chuck is much better in wood, as it can be made by any common turner at a trifling expense, and possesses more strength than can possibly be required.
    • 1912, Fred Herbert Colvin, Frank Arthur Stanley, American Machinist Grinding Book, page 322,
      Iron and steel in contact with magnets retain some of the magnetism, which is sometimes more or less of a nuisance in getting small work off the chucks.
    • 2003, Julie K. Petersen, “chuck”, entry in Fiber Optics Illustrated Dictionary, page 181,
      A fiber optic splicing device may be equipped with V-grooves or chucks to hold the two pieces of fiber optic filament to be spliced. If it has chucks, they are typically either clamping chucks or vacuum chucks.
    • 2008, Ramon Francis Bonaquist, NHCRP Report 614: Refining the Simple Performance Tester for Use in Routine Practice, page 30,
      The first step in preparing a test specimen with the FlexPrepTM is to secure the gyratory specimen in the chuck of the machine.
Translations[edit]

meat from the shoulder of a cow

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic dialect term for chicken, imitative of a hen's cluck.

Noun[edit]

chuck (pluralchucks)

  1. (dialect,obsolete) A chicken, a hen.
  2. A clucking sound.
    • 1998, Scott Freeman, Jon C. Herron, Evolutionary Analysis, page 604,
      The call always starts with a whine, to which the males add from 0 to 6 chucks. In choice tests, females approach calls that contain chucks in preference to calls that contain no chucks.
  3. (slang) A friend or close acquaintance; term of endearment.
    Are you all right, chuck?
    • Shakespeare
      Pray, chuck, come hither.
  4. A gentle touch or tap.
    She gave him an affectionate chuck under the chin.
  5. (informal) A casual throw.
  6. (slang) An act of vomiting.
  7. (cricket,informal) A throw, an incorrect bowling action.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

chuck (third-person singular simple presentchucks, present participlechucking, simple past and past participlechucked)

  1. To make a clucking sound.
  2. To call, as a hen her chickens.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  3. To touch or tap gently.
  4. (transitive,informal) To throw, especially in a careless or inaccurate manner.
    Chuck that magazine to me, would you?
  5. (transitive,informal) To discard, to throw away.
    This food's gone off - you'd better chuck it.
  6. (transitive,informal) To jilt; to dump.
    She's chucked me for another man!
  7. (intransitive,slang) To vomit.
  8. (intransitive, cricket) To throw; to bowl with an incorrect action.
  9. (South Africa,slang,intransitive) To leave; to depart; to bounce.
    Let's chuck.
  10. (obsolete) To chuckle; to laugh.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Marston to this entry?)
  11. To place in a chuck, or hold by means of a chuck, as in turning; to bore or turn (a hole) in a revolving piece held in a chuck.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

cricket: to throw the ball rather than bowl

Etymology 3[edit]

From woodchuck.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

chuck (pluralchucks)

  1. Abbreviation of woodchuck.
    • 1976 August, Sylvia Bashline, Woodchucks Are Tablefare Too, Field & Stream, page 50,
      Chucks are plentiful, and most farmers are glad to have the incurable diggers kept at tolerable population levels. […] For some reason, my family didn′t eat ′chucks. Few families in the area did.

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

chuck (pluralchucks)

  1. (Scotland) A small pebble.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
  • chucks (game played with pebbles)

Chinook Jargon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Nootkač̕̕aʔak.

Noun[edit]

chuck

  1. water

Derived terms[edit]

A chuck (device to hold an object in place)

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